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FSA Transition to FAST

Since Gov. DeSantis announced the end of the Florida Standards Assessment and a transition to progress monitoring, we have been in constant communication with lawmakers to be sure that the voice of professional educators are heard in this transition.

We’ve also been eagerly awaiting legislation on this transition to see some specifics beyond  Gov. DeSantis’ general announcement. SB 1048 was released the day before Thanksgiving and it provides a first glance at what lawmakers are considering. There are a lot more specifics below, but the bottom line is this: the proposed bill does not reduce testing, nor does it eliminate the big end of year test.

What SB 1048 does is shift all current testing that is done with paper and pencil and to computer-based testing. Because this bill deals with progress monitoring from Prekindergarten through tenth grade, it requires even four-year old children to sit in front of a computer and take a statewide, standardized test. This is not what DeSantis promised, and most importantly it is not what is best for Florida’s students.

We are still early in this process, and the House has not released their version of the testing bill. Now is the time to let your legislators know what you want to see as we transition away from FSA towards something new. 

Click on the bold headings below to find how each grade level and subject area is slated to be impacted by SB 1048.

  • Measure student performance in oral language development, phonological and phonemic awareness, knowledge of print and letters, decoding, encoding, fluency vocabulary, and comprehension, as applicable, by grade level (Page 4, lines 106-110)
  • Be computer-based (Page 4, line 111)
  • Provide screening and diagnostic capabilities (Page 4, lines 111-12)
  • Identify students who have a substantial deficiency in reading, including students with characteristics of dyslexia (Page 4, lines 113-114)
  • Inform instruction (Page 4, lines 115)
  • Progress monitoring results from the grade 3 progress monitoring assessment may be used for VPK performance metrics (Page 5, lines 125-129)
  • Provide VPK providers, school districts, schools, and teachers with data and resources that enhance differentiated instruction and parent communication. (Page 5, lines 136-139)
  • Must be a comprehensive assessment (Page 12, line 337)
  • Administered in the Spring. The Florida State Board of Education will set the specific testing schedule (Page 12, Line 338)
  • Results must be used for accountability purposes for school grades, school improvement ratings for alternative schools and for graduation requirements (Page 12, lines 339-343)
  • Students must be provided an opportunity to retake the 10th grade ELA end of the year assessment. Any student who does not earn a passing score on the 10th grade ELA end of the year assessment can meet graduation requirements by earning a concordant score on the SAT or ACT (Pages 12-13, lines 343-351)
  • Reading passages and writing prompts must incorporate grade-level core curricula content from social studies (Page 12, lines 345-347)
  • A passing score represents grade-level performance. The Florida State Board of Education will have to engage in rulemaking on this. (Page 18, lines 516-517)
  • Results must be available by May 31 (Page 21, lines 587-594)
  • Screening and progress monitoring will occur at the beginning of the school year and the middle of the school year. The Florida State Board of Education will develop the specific testing schedules (Page 11, lines 357-362)
  • Measure student progress in grades 3-8 in meeting the appropriate expectations in the mathematics standards (Page 13, lines 363-365)
  • Be valid, reliable, developmentally appropriate and computer-based assessment (Page 13, lines 366-367)
  • Monitor student progress (Page 13, line 368)
  • Identity students who have a substantial deficiency in mathematics (Page 13, lines 369-370)
  • Inform instruction (Page 13, line 370)
  • Provide results to teachers within one week (Page 13, line 373)
  • Provide results to parents within two weeks (Page 13, line 373)
  • Provide students, teachers, and parents with actionable feedback during the school year to tailor instruction aimed at improved student outcomes in mathematics. (Page 13, lines 374-376)
  • Must be a comprehensive assessment (Page 13, line 380)
  • Administered in the Spring. The Florida State Board of Education will set the specific testing schedule (Page 13, lines 381-382)
  • Results must be used for accountability purposes for school grades, school improvement ratings for alternative schools and for graduation requirements (Page 13, lines 382-385)
  • A passing score represents grade-level performance. The Florida State Board of Education will have to engage in rulemaking on this. (Page 18, lines 516-517)
  • Results must be available by May 31 (Page 21, lines 587-594)
  • No changes from current law to the content of the test.
  • No statewide progress monitoring assessments at this time
  • A passing score represents grade-level performance. The Florida State Board of Education will have to engage in rulemaking on this. (Page 18, lines 516-517)
  • Results must be available by May 31 (Page 21, lines 587-594)
  • No changes from current law to the content of the test.
  • No statewide progress monitoring assessments at this time
  • A passing score represents grade-level performance. The Florida State Board of Education will have to engage in rulemaking on this. (Page 18, lines 516-517)
  • Results must be available by May 31 (Page 21, lines 587-594)
  • By Jan. 31, 2025, the commissioner of education shall provide recommendations on additional ways to streamline testing. These recommendations must include an analysis of the correlation between the two progress monitoring tests and the end-of-the-year assessment to determine if the results from the progress monitoring assessments can be used in lieu of the end-of-the-year assessment. (Page 28, lines 795-803)
  • School and district grades in the 2022-23 school year will serve as an “informational baseline.” (Page 32, lines 914-915)
  • During the baseline year of 2022-23, baseline grades must be set so that the same percentage of schools receive a grade of A, B, C, D, and F as they did during the 2021-22 school year. (Page 32, lines 915-918)
  • When learning gains data becomes available in the 2023-24 school year, the State Board of Education will determine if the school grading scale needs to be adjusted. (Page 32, lines 919-922)
  • No school will be required to implement a turnaround option in the 2023-24 school year based on the school’s 2022-23 school grade. (Page 32, lines 923-925)
  • A school that is in turnaround and receives a grade of C or higher during the 2022-23 school year can be released from turnaround status. (Pages 32-33, lines 925-931)
  • A school that receives the same or lower school grade in 2022-23 compared to 2021-22 is not subject to sanctions or penalties that would otherwise result.
  • A 3rd grade student who does not pass the 3rd grade ELA end of the year assessment in 2022-23 may be promoted to 4th grade if there is a good cause exemption under current law or other means reasonably calculated to provide reliable evidence of student performance. (Page 33, lines 941-947)
  • Alternative schools will not receive a school improvement rating for the 2022-23 school year. When learning gains results are available for the 2023-24 school year, the State Board of Education will set the scale for commendable, maintaining and unsatisfactory ratings. (Pages 33-34, lines 954-959)
  • Be provided with results in a timely manner
  • Be notified of acceleration options including
    • The process to request student whole-grade promotion (Page 24, lines 692)
    • The process to request midyear promotion (Page 24, line 693)
    • The process to request subject matter acceleration which would results in a student attending a different school, which includes the right to be advised on the Academically Challenging Curriculum to Enhance Learning (ACCEL) options (Page 24, lines 693-697)
    • The option of early graduation (Page 25, line 697)
  • Be notified of deficiencies including
    • Notification their child being identified as having a substantial deficiency in reading (Page 25, lines 699-701)
    • Notification their child will be retained in 3rd grade as a result of not meeting the proficiency level required on the end of year assessment and the reasons the child is not eligible for a good cause exemption (Page 25,lines 702-706)
  • Be notified of their child’s academic progress including
    • An annual report on their child’s progress toward achieving state and district expectations for proficiency in ELA, science, social studies, and mathematics (Page 25, 707-710)
    • Academic achievement and learning gain data for their child (Page 25, line 718-720)
    • Notification of their child’s nonparticipation in the statewide, standardized assessment program and the implications of nonparticipation (Page 25, lines 721-724)
  • Be notified of accommodations including
    • Notification if their child with a disability or with limited English proficiency is provided with instructional accommodations in the classroom that are not allowed as accommodations for statewide, standardized assessments. (Page 26, lines 726-733)
  • The right to consent before a school district administers district-required local assessments that exceed 5% of their child’s total school hours pursuant to 22(7)(e). This right is only for parents of children in district schools, not charter schools.

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