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UFF Legislative Toolkit

Call, email and meet with your state representative and senator

It may seem antiquated, but your elected officials hearing from you makes a difference, because their staff has to document how many points of contact they receive for or against any piece of legislation that they will be voting on. So together, we can make a real difference here!

You are a constituent of these legislators, and they need to honor your request to hear your concerns and schedule a time to meet with you in person or virtually. (Read more about these bills below).

Enter your home address below and complete the form to request a meeting with your senator and representative about SB1014/HB 835 and SB78/HB947:

Here are a few more ways to take action:

1. Testify in person or virtually!

If you are willing to to testify — in person, in Tallahassee or remotely —  or offer written testimony, please let UFF (uff@floridaea.org) know ASAP.

2. Write an OpEd for your local paper

FEA’s Write a Letter to the Editor tool has weblinks to many local papers — or you can contact your paper directly. Please share it widely so we can cross-promote your contribution! Make your personal story heard and felt as it relates to the proposed legislation and its impacts on your workplace.

3. Other ways to take action:

Join the Working Families Lobby Corps!

2021 Virtual Working Families Lobby Corps signup — Through the Florida AFL-CIO, members can sign up to help AFL-CIO, one of our affiliated unions, with its advocacy against union-busting and education-hobbling bills. This session’s work will have flexible hours and be ENTIRELY VIRTUAL.

More info on the Virtual Working Families Lobby Corps can be found at http://flaflcio.org/virtual-working-families-lobby-corps.

Make and post a video

Upload a video telling your political representatives to stand with educators and say NO to these bills
(& tag them on social media).

For inspiration:

Host a Zoom phone party or video party to:

  • Make phone calls to legislative offices
  • Write postcards to legislators
  • Tweet to legislators
  • Post video clips of committee meetings
  • Car parades in front of legislators’ at-home offices
  • Send short written letters to legislators
  • Consider taking out an ad in local newspapers targeted towards legislators
  • Create a press release for local newspapers

Learn more about the bills we’re most concerned about

  • HB 835/SB 1014 — affects UFF and education unions – A recent amendment to HB 835 requires faculty/GA unions to report 50% membership to maintain certification, authorizes PERC to investigate union’s claims that it has met 50% threshold, authorizes a college/university to challenge accuracy of the unions’ claims, provides for revocation of certification as an outcome of the investigation.
  • HB 947/SB 78 – affects all unions – An employer may not deduct dues until it confirms with the employee that they want to join the union and employees must reauthorize union membership every time a new contract is negotiated. In committee discussions, Republican members are talking about carving out police/fire unions — a very bad sign that suggests it will pass.

The Week Ahead in the  Legislature

Interim Committee Week 3: October 18-22

Meetings relating to education are shown below.  Click on the name of the respective chamber to see the full calendar for  the week’s meetings in the Senate and the House.

All meetings are streamed live and on The Florida Channel where they are also available for on-demand viewing within 24 hours of the conclusion of the meeting.

Agenda Watch: It will be a slow start to the week with no education related committee meetings on Monday or Tuesday, but things pick up on Wednesday with four education subcommittees meeting, including both the House and Senate education appropriations subcommittees.  

Monday, October 18

Tuesday, October 19

Wednesday, October 20

Thursday, October 21

Friday, October 22

  • No meetings scheduled in either chamber.

Upcoming 2022 Legislative Schedule

  • Interim Committee Week 3: October 18–22
  • Interim Committee Week 4: November 1–5
  • Interim Committee Week 5: November 15–19
  • Interim Committee Week 6: November 29–December 3
  • Regular Session: January 11-March 11

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